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Energy Transfers Fracked Gas Pipeline Spills Six Times in Two Weeks

Energy Transfers Fracked Gas Pipeline Spills Six Times in Two Weeks – Over the weekend, Sierra Club discovered that Energy Transfer’s fracked gas pipeline, Rover, has spilled six times in a two-week period, has had six stormwater violations, and violated the Clean Air Act all before the pipeline even goes into operation.

The Rover pipeline will carry fracked gas across four states, including 18 Ohio counties. It will cross three major rivers that feed into Lake Erie: the Maumee, Sandusky, and Portage. It’s route would also put Tuscarawas River, Wayne National Forest, other waterways, and countless miles of forest and farmlands at risk for contamination and disruption.

“Energy Transfer is either incompetent, or simply doesn’t care about Ohioans’ safety,” said Jen Miller, Director of Sierra Club Ohio. “The recklessness constructing Rover Pipeline has put our clean water, air, and land in immediate danger with its spills and violations, and it must be stopped. Ohio EPA needs to keep our communities safe by forcing a halt to the pipeline’s construction until the company completely reorganizes its construction program and fully remedies the harm it has already caused to communities and landowners thus far.”

Energy Transfer failed to inform the public its numerous spills and violations. Rather, the news was discovered after Sierra Club’s attorney, Richard Sahli, filed a records request with the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency.

“Energy Transfer has caused more widespread environmental damage throughout Ohio than any other company in history,” said attorney Richard Sahli. “This pattern of reckless destruction calls for the strongest penalties provided in Ohio law, including a criminal investigation of the responsible individuals within the corporation and its subcontractors.”

Documents obtained during the record request indicate that in addition to over 14 violations, the company anticipates additional spills throughout the duration of the project, which is estimated to last six months. The records request also uncovered a recent Ohio EPA letter to Rover Pipeline in which the Agency demanded a fine of $431,000 for its violations to date.

“If Energy Transfer is already destroying our air, water, and land, how can we trust them to build a pipeline that actually functions properly,” asks Miller. “Energy Transfer has proven to not be trustworthy.”

In addition to the Rover pipeline, Energy Transfer is the company behind the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline.

Energy Transfer’s currently known environmental violations include:

April 5, 2017: unauthorized pollution release impacting tributaries of Woodfield Reservoir in Monroe County, failure to control stormwater

April 8, 2017: 1,000 gallons of drilling fluid pollution released into wetland near Indian Fork River, in Tuscarawas County; covered 2500 square foot area of wetland

April 10, 2017: 600 gallons of drilling fluid pollution released into stream, wetland and pond in Richland Township, Belmont County

April 10, 2017: unauthorized pollution release impacting tributaries of Woodfield Reservoir in Monroe County, failure to control stormwater

April 11, 2017: unauthorized pollution release from failure to manage stormwater in Bloomdale, Wood County

April 11, 2017: Clean Air Act violation, open burning of site preparation material near a home in Toronto, Ohio

April 11, 2017: Stormwater violations in Wood, Richland, and Crawford Counties because of failure to manage vehicle tracking of drilling materials onto public roadways

April 12, 2017: unauthorized pollution release into Bull Creek in Wood County, failure to control stormwater

April 13,2017:2 million gallons of drilling fluid pollution accumulating in high quality wetland adjacent to Tuscarawas River in Navarre Township, Stark County; covered 500,000 sq foot area of the category 3 wetland

April 14, 2017: 50,000 gallons of drilling fluid pollution released into wetland in Mifflin Township, Richland County

April 17, 2017: 200 gallons of drilling fluid pollution released into a pond in Monroe Township, Harrison County

April 22, 2017: 200 gallons of drilling fluid pollution released into stream in Wooster Township, Wayne County

May 2, 2017: unauthorized pollution release from failure to manage stormwater in Bloomdale, Wood County

May 3, 2017: unauthorized pollution release into Brushy Fork Creek, Cadiz, Harrison County, failure to control stormwater

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